Mitsubishi Cordia Commercial

Now, the Cordia isn't the sort of car that often makes even Japanese car fetishists salivate.

It's got that Renault Fuego-ish angular period aspect: though the Cordia had hard, origami style lines where the Fuego had voluptuous flow.

It came between the Tredia and the Galant too: bang in the middle of equally unremarkable productions whose target was that mass of everyman folk who needed the reliability and affordability that this car provided.

Still, between 1982 and the end of the decade it was one of those Japanese cars you might not have been able to name.

The Turbo version, though, with a little bonnet bulge and suitably period stripy trim and alloys, now somehow looks as if it might be capable of a quantum of hipster steeze.

Check out the advert. Stretches the trade descriptions act (if the Japanese ever had one) to the limit, we think.

  • http://gearboxmagazine.com/ Brian Driggs

    While it might have been a bit odd, I suspect these turbo models played an important role in the development of Mitsubishi's world class, turbocharged vehicles. Wasn't long after these we got the Lancer 2000, the Starion, the Galant VR4, and, ultimately, the Evo.

    Humble, eccentric roots.