Agni: Is This the future of Bike Racing?

The Lowdown
Anglo-Indian company Agni manufactures DC motors in India that are used mainly to power go-karts for indoor tracks. "We entered the race to promote the motors," designer Cedric Lynch says. The TTX organizers put Agni in touch with the rider Robert Barber, who recommended converting a Suzuki GSX-R750 to electric power. "He arranged for us to buy this one without its engine. But fitting everything into the space occupied by the internal combustion engine was the biggest challenge."

The bike runs two DC electric motors. It had to use two because the company doesn't make a single motor durable enough to take all the power this bike can create. Lynch says, "The two motors are simply coupled with a shaft and then drive the rear wheel with a fixed ratio. It's a twist-and-go machine." The false fuel tank covers the bike's battery-management system.

agni-bike

What's Next?
During the TTX, Cedric Lynch became the cult figurehead. After all, Agni won the race. Lynch says, "It is possible we could collaborate with a manufacturer to develop electric motorcycles for sale."

Why It Matters
It won the very first electric TT, by 3 minutes 7 seconds, lapping 10 mph faster than its competitors. In terms of performance, this bike set the standard by which all future electric race motorcycles will be judged.

  • louisvarney

    i'd ride it, im not into this environmental stuff that they seem to pump down our necks. Something different to try, and i bet its brilliant. electric power is mostly unharnessed, if we looked at usuing the by products as well this could be so efficient that it would be cheap to tax, insure and because its all electrics, cheap to repair. Mechanics view maybe, but i want to see more of these avaliable, a new challenge, mechanically, along with it being an innovative concept that could leap us into the future. they're all on about fuel supplies running out and although there are technologies much as hydrofuel about, everyone thinks of electrics first.