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Forevr Bikes Moto Rumi

Forever Bikes

Bikes Culture

After a certain amount of time, they become part of who you are

Ever owned something you just know you can never sell? 

When it comes to motorbikes, these people know them like the back of their hand. A back of hand they’ve spent thirty years staring at, as they twist an oh-so-familiar throttle.

That’s because Bikesure Insurance has been seeking out incredible stories of people who have owned their bikes longer than some people own their own teeth. There’s a ‘minimum’ of thirty years of ownership needed to be classed as worthy of a feature in Forever Bikes, but some of these intriguing individuals go far beyond that. Almost double, in fact. Pete Hockley, for example, bought his Lambretta when he was 16. That was in 1964 when the Beatles topped the charts and BBC Two was born.

Forever bikes lambretta

Half a century of owning the same bike makes it more than just transportation, it’s an extra part of your body. Not in a weird ‘nuclear fallout way’, more like an extra heart or an indelible twinkle in the eye. You can see the full set of pictures and more about Pete here.

Prices of such vehicles are soaring, but would Pete sell his?

No. And that’s a common theme here.

Take Chris Cobbold. He bought a 250cc Royal Enfield in 1959 for £212. That’s approaching 60 years ago. The bike is now worth a vast amount, but Chris isn’t interested in that at all. He passed his bike test on a bike he built himself and worked up to getting this, his dream bike. No way he wants someone else to own it now, and that’s clearly a good case for including it in the Forever Bikes project.

Forever Bikes Royal Enfield

That’s because these bikes and owners go beyond long-term ownership. This is about vehicle-owner relationships that have no visible end, about being together forever. Thirty years is just the entry into this exclusive club. There’s not meant to be an exit.

A third example is Terry Bedford, although his passion needs to stretch beyond a single set of handlebars. Having bought his first Moto Rumi scooter in 1960, he loved the bikes so much it began a collection. He soon had two more Moto Rumis, and he still owns the trio.

Forever Bikes Moto Rumi

Will he ever part with them? You’ve guessed it, no he won’t. Of course he won’t.

According to Terry, people think he’s nuts. We, however, think he and all the other people featured on the Forever Bikes site are far from nuts. They’re inspirations.

See more owners with their Forever Bikes including a Fantic Chopper, a BSA Super Rocket and many more here.

 

 

 

 

 

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